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The intellectual powers : a study of human nature /

by Hacker, P. M. S. (Peter Michael Stephan), autore .
Publisher: Chichester, West Sussex ; Malden, MA : Wiley Blackwell, 2013Description: xii, 475 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9781444332476; 1444332473; 9781118651216; 1118651219.
Contents:
Cover; Title page; Copyright page; Contents; Preface; Introduction: The Project; Prolegomena; 1: Consciousness as the Mark of the Mental; 1. Consciousness as a mark of modernity; 2. The genealogy of the concept of consciousness; 3. The analytic of consciousness; 4. The early modern philosophical conception of consciousness; 5. The dialectic of consciousness I; 6. The contemporary philosophical conception of consciousness; 7. The dialectic of consciousness II; 8. The illusions of self-consciousness; 2: Intentionality as the Mark of the Mental; 1. Intentionality; 2. Intentional 'objects' 3. The central sun: the relation of thought to reality4. The first circle: what do we believe (hope, suspect, etc.)?; 5. The second circle: the relation of language to reality; 6. The third circle: the relation of thought to language; 7. The fourth circle: the epistemology of intentionality; 8. The fifth circle: meaning and understanding; 3: Mastery of a Language as the Mark of a Mind; 1. A language-using animal; 2. Linguistic communication; 3. Knowing a language; 4. Meaning something; 5. Understanding and interpreting; 6. Meaning and use. 7. The dialectic of understanding: the 'mystery' of understanding new sentencesPART I: The Cognitive and Doxastic Powers; 4: Knowledge; 1. The value of knowledge; 2. The grammatical groundwork; 3. The semantic field; 4. What knowledge is not; 5. Certainty; 6. Analyses of knowledge; 7. Knowledge and ability; 8. Knowing-how; 9. What is knowledge? The role of 'know' in human discourse; 5: Belief; 1. The web of belief; 2. The grammatical groundwork; 3. The surrounding landscape; 4. Voluntariness and responsibility for belief; 5. Belief and feelings; 6. Belief and dispositions. 7. Belief and mental states8. Why believing something cannot be a brain state; 9. What is belief? The role of 'believe' in human discourse; 6: Knowledge, Belief and the Epistemology of Belief; 1. Knowledge and belief; 2. The epistemology of belief; 3. Non-standard cases: self-deception and unconscious beliefs; 7: Sensation and Perception; 1. The cognitive powers of the senses; 2. Sensation; 3. Perception and sensation; 4. Sensation, feeling and tactile perception; 8: Perception; 1. Perceptual organs, the senses and proper sensibles; 2. Perceptual powers: cognition and volition. 3. The classical causal theory of perception4. The modern causal theory of perception; 9: Memory; 1. Memory as a form of knowledge; 2. The objects of memory; 3. The faculty and its actualities; 4. Forms of memory; 5. Further conceptual links and contrasts; 6. The dialectic of memory I: the Aristotelian legacy; 7. The dialectic of memory II: trace theory; PART II: The Cogitative Powers; 10: Thought and Thinking; 1. Floundering without an overview; 2. The varieties of thinking; 3. Is thinking an activity?; 4. What do we think in?; 5. Thought, language and the language of thought.
Summary: The Intellectual Powers is a philosophical investigation into the cognitive and cogitative powers of mankind. It develops a connective analysis of our powers of consciousness, intentionality, mastery of language, knowledge, belief, certainty, sensation, perception, memory, thought, and imagination, by one of Britain's leading philosophers. It is an essential guide and handbook for philosophers, psychologists, and cognitive neuroscientists. The culmination of 45 years of reflection on the philosophy of mind, epistemology, and the nature of the human person.
Item type Location Call number Copy Status Date due
Books Books Dip. Filosofia X 1760 (Browse shelf) Copy 001 Available

Cover; Title page; Copyright page; Contents; Preface; Introduction: The Project; Prolegomena; 1: Consciousness as the Mark of the Mental; 1. Consciousness as a mark of modernity; 2. The genealogy of the concept of consciousness; 3. The analytic of consciousness; 4. The early modern philosophical conception of consciousness; 5. The dialectic of consciousness I; 6. The contemporary philosophical conception of consciousness; 7. The dialectic of consciousness II; 8. The illusions of self-consciousness; 2: Intentionality as the Mark of the Mental; 1. Intentionality; 2. Intentional 'objects' 3. The central sun: the relation of thought to reality4. The first circle: what do we believe (hope, suspect, etc.)?; 5. The second circle: the relation of language to reality; 6. The third circle: the relation of thought to language; 7. The fourth circle: the epistemology of intentionality; 8. The fifth circle: meaning and understanding; 3: Mastery of a Language as the Mark of a Mind; 1. A language-using animal; 2. Linguistic communication; 3. Knowing a language; 4. Meaning something; 5. Understanding and interpreting; 6. Meaning and use. 7. The dialectic of understanding: the 'mystery' of understanding new sentencesPART I: The Cognitive and Doxastic Powers; 4: Knowledge; 1. The value of knowledge; 2. The grammatical groundwork; 3. The semantic field; 4. What knowledge is not; 5. Certainty; 6. Analyses of knowledge; 7. Knowledge and ability; 8. Knowing-how; 9. What is knowledge? The role of 'know' in human discourse; 5: Belief; 1. The web of belief; 2. The grammatical groundwork; 3. The surrounding landscape; 4. Voluntariness and responsibility for belief; 5. Belief and feelings; 6. Belief and dispositions. 7. Belief and mental states8. Why believing something cannot be a brain state; 9. What is belief? The role of 'believe' in human discourse; 6: Knowledge, Belief and the Epistemology of Belief; 1. Knowledge and belief; 2. The epistemology of belief; 3. Non-standard cases: self-deception and unconscious beliefs; 7: Sensation and Perception; 1. The cognitive powers of the senses; 2. Sensation; 3. Perception and sensation; 4. Sensation, feeling and tactile perception; 8: Perception; 1. Perceptual organs, the senses and proper sensibles; 2. Perceptual powers: cognition and volition. 3. The classical causal theory of perception4. The modern causal theory of perception; 9: Memory; 1. Memory as a form of knowledge; 2. The objects of memory; 3. The faculty and its actualities; 4. Forms of memory; 5. Further conceptual links and contrasts; 6. The dialectic of memory I: the Aristotelian legacy; 7. The dialectic of memory II: trace theory; PART II: The Cogitative Powers; 10: Thought and Thinking; 1. Floundering without an overview; 2. The varieties of thinking; 3. Is thinking an activity?; 4. What do we think in?; 5. Thought, language and the language of thought.

The Intellectual Powers is a philosophical investigation into the cognitive and cogitative powers of mankind. It develops a connective analysis of our powers of consciousness, intentionality, mastery of language, knowledge, belief, certainty, sensation, perception, memory, thought, and imagination, by one of Britain's leading philosophers. It is an essential guide and handbook for philosophers, psychologists, and cognitive neuroscientists. The culmination of 45 years of reflection on the philosophy of mind, epistemology, and the nature of the human person.

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