Biblioteca della Pontificia Università della Santa Croce Catalogo della Biblioteca

Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Wallace, Darwin, and the origin of species /

by Costa, James T, autore .
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. ; London : Harvard University Press, 2014Description: xvii, 331 p. : ill., c. geogr. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780674729698; 0674729692.
Contents:
Granted the law, Alfred Russel Wallace's evolutionary travels -- The consilient Mr. Wallace, transmutation and related themes of the Species notebook -- Wallace and Darwin, parallels, intersections and departures on the evolutionary road -- Two indefatigable naturalists, Wallace and Darwin's watershed papers -- A striking coincidence, The Wallace-Darwin papers of 1858 compared -- True with a vengeance, from delicate arrangement to conspiracy: a guide coda -- The force of admiration.
Summary: Charles Darwin is often credited with discovering evolution through natural selection, but the idea was not his alone. The naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace, working independently, saw the same process at work in the natural world and elaborated much the same theory. Their important scientific contributions made both men famous in their lifetimes, but Wallace slipped into obscurity after his death, while Darwin's renown grew. Dispelling the misperceptions that continue to paint Wallace as a secondary figure, James Costa reveals the two naturalists as true equals in advancing one of the greatest scientific discoveries of all time. Analyzing Wallace's "Species Notebook," Costa shows how Wallace's methods and thought processes paralleled Darwin's, yet inspired insights uniquely his own. Kept during his Southeast Asian expeditions of the 1850s, the notebook is a window into Wallace's early evolutionary ideas. It records his evidence-gathering, critiques of anti-evolutionary arguments, and plans for a book on "transmutation." Most important, it demonstrates conclusively that natural selection was not some idea Wallace stumbled upon, as is sometimes assumed, but was the culmination of a decade-long quest to solve the mystery of the origin of species. Wallace, Darwin, and the Origin of Species" also reexamines the pivotal episode in 1858 when Wallace sent Darwin a manuscript announcing his discovery of natural selection, prompting a joint public reading of the two men's papers on the subject. Costa's analysis of the "Species Notebook" shines a new light on these readings, further illuminating the independent nature of Wallace's discoveries. -- Review: Alfred Russel Wallace (1823 1913) and Charles Darwin (1809 82) arrived at many of the same ideas about natural selection at almost precisely the same time while in correspondence with each other. Darwin s publication of his theories made him a legend, but Wallace has been mostly relegated to a footnote in the history books. Here Costa hopes to remedy that imbalance, recounting and analyzing Wallace s life and work with the ease and familiarity befitting one who edited and prepared the naturalist s previously unpublished Species Notebook." The author attempts to pin down Wallace s inner life and thought processes through painstaking textual analysis of his subject s reading material, correspondence, notebooks, and publications, as well as some of Darwin s.--Kate Horowitz"Library Journal" (04/15/2014)".
Item type Location Call number Copy Status Date due
Books Books Dip. Filosofia WA 1683 (Browse shelf) Copy 001 Available

Bibliogr. p. 301-315.

Granted the law, Alfred Russel Wallace's evolutionary travels -- The consilient Mr. Wallace, transmutation and related themes of the Species notebook -- Wallace and Darwin, parallels, intersections and departures on the evolutionary road -- Two indefatigable naturalists, Wallace and Darwin's watershed papers -- A striking coincidence, The Wallace-Darwin papers of 1858 compared -- True with a vengeance, from delicate arrangement to conspiracy: a guide coda -- The force of admiration.

Charles Darwin is often credited with discovering evolution through natural selection, but the idea was not his alone. The naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace, working independently, saw the same process at work in the natural world and elaborated much the same theory. Their important scientific contributions made both men famous in their lifetimes, but Wallace slipped into obscurity after his death, while Darwin's renown grew. Dispelling the misperceptions that continue to paint Wallace as a secondary figure, James Costa reveals the two naturalists as true equals in advancing one of the greatest scientific discoveries of all time. Analyzing Wallace's "Species Notebook," Costa shows how Wallace's methods and thought processes paralleled Darwin's, yet inspired insights uniquely his own. Kept during his Southeast Asian expeditions of the 1850s, the notebook is a window into Wallace's early evolutionary ideas. It records his evidence-gathering, critiques of anti-evolutionary arguments, and plans for a book on "transmutation." Most important, it demonstrates conclusively that natural selection was not some idea Wallace stumbled upon, as is sometimes assumed, but was the culmination of a decade-long quest to solve the mystery of the origin of species. Wallace, Darwin, and the Origin of Species" also reexamines the pivotal episode in 1858 when Wallace sent Darwin a manuscript announcing his discovery of natural selection, prompting a joint public reading of the two men's papers on the subject. Costa's analysis of the "Species Notebook" shines a new light on these readings, further illuminating the independent nature of Wallace's discoveries. -- Review: Alfred Russel Wallace (1823 1913) and Charles Darwin (1809 82) arrived at many of the same ideas about natural selection at almost precisely the same time while in correspondence with each other. Darwin s publication of his theories made him a legend, but Wallace has been mostly relegated to a footnote in the history books. Here Costa hopes to remedy that imbalance, recounting and analyzing Wallace s life and work with the ease and familiarity befitting one who edited and prepared the naturalist s previously unpublished Species Notebook." The author attempts to pin down Wallace s inner life and thought processes through painstaking textual analysis of his subject s reading material, correspondence, notebooks, and publications, as well as some of Darwin s.--Kate Horowitz"Library Journal" (04/15/2014)".

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Home: PUSC   Koha: koha-community.org   Facebook: Koha Gruppo Italiano

Languages: