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Paul in Athens : the popular religious context of Acts 17 /

by Rothschild, Clare K, autore .
Series: Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament : 341.Publisher: Tübingen : Mohr Siebeck, ©2014Description: xix, 215 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9783161532603; 3161532600.Subject(s): Biblia. N.T. Actus apostolorum 17 -- Interpretazione | Paulus, santo, apostolo -- Dimora [ad] AteneSummary: Paul's visit to Athens, in particular the Areopahus speech, is one of the most well known excerpts of early Christian literature. It is the most significant speech by Paul to a Gentile audience in Acts functioning as a literary crest of the overall narrative. Yet critical analysts also describe it as an ad hoc blend of Green and Jewish elements. In this study, Clare K. Rothschild examines how the nexus of popular second-century traditions crystallizing around the Cretan prophet Epimenides explains these seemingly miscellaneous and impromptu aspects of the text. Her investigation exposes correspondences between Epimenidea and the Lukan Paul, not limited to the altar "to an unknown god" and the saying, "In him, we live, and move, and have our being" (17:28a), concluding that in addition to popular philosophical ideals, the episode of Paul in Athens utilizes popular 'religious' topoi to reinforce a central narrative aim.
Item type Location Call number Copy Status Date due
Books Books Dip. Teologia GG 985 (Browse shelf) Copy 001 Available

Bibliogr. p. [155]-185.

Paul's visit to Athens, in particular the Areopahus speech, is one of the most well known excerpts of early Christian literature. It is the most significant speech by Paul to a Gentile audience in Acts functioning as a literary crest of the overall narrative. Yet critical analysts also describe it as an ad hoc blend of Green and Jewish elements. In this study, Clare K. Rothschild examines how the nexus of popular second-century traditions crystallizing around the Cretan prophet Epimenides explains these seemingly miscellaneous and impromptu aspects of the text. Her investigation exposes correspondences between Epimenidea and the Lukan Paul, not limited to the altar "to an unknown god" and the saying, "In him, we live, and move, and have our being" (17:28a), concluding that in addition to popular philosophical ideals, the episode of Paul in Athens utilizes popular 'religious' topoi to reinforce a central narrative aim.

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