Biblioteca della Pontificia Università della Santa Croce Catalogo della Biblioteca

Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Musical rhetoric : foundations and annotation schemes /

by Saint-Dizier, Patrick, autore .
Series: Focus series : ; Computer engineering : Publisher: London : Hoboken, NJ : ISTE ; Wiley, 2014Description: xv, 179 p. : mus. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781848215610.Online resources: Publisher description | Table of contents only
Contents:
Cover page; Half-Title page; Title page; Copyright page; Contents; Preface; 1: An Introduction to Classical Rhetoric; 1.1. A few basic definitions; 1.2. The structure of rhetoric; 1.2.1. Rhetoric and communication; 1.2.2. The structure of classical rhetoric; 1.2.3. The invention step; 1.2.4. The arrangement; 1.2.5. The style or elocution step; 1.2.6. The delivery or action; 1.2.7. The facets of rhetoric; 1.3. Some figures of speech; 1.3.1. Introduction; 1.3.2. The major figures of speech of interest in music rhetoric; 1.4. Argumentation and explanation. 1.5. Conclusion: a few historical milestones of traditional rhetoric1.6. A few historical references for classical rhetoric; Classical period; Medieval; Renaissance; Eighteenth century; 2: Language, Music and the Rhetoric Discourse; 2.1. Music and language; 2.1.1. On the relations between language and music; 2.1.2. Going into the details of music parameters, music for rhetoric; 2.1.3. Music and rhetoric; 2.2. A few historical milestones of music rhetoric emergence and evolution; 2.2.1. The Middle Ages and the Renaissance; 2.2.2. The transition between the Renaissance and the Baroque period. 2.2.3. The Baroque period2.2.4. The Classical period; 2.2.5. The Romantic period; 2.3. Main contemporary trends in music rhetoric; 3: The Symbolism of Musical Elements; 3.1. Symbolic and perceptual properties of modes and tonalities; 3.2. Perceptual and symbolic properties of intervals; 3.3. Musical figures and their role in rhetoric; 3.4. Figures of rhythm and their roles in rhetoric; 3.5. Motive alternations; 3.6. Figures of counterpoint; 3.7. The symbolism of numbers and proportions; 3.8. The rhetoric contents of classical forms; 3.8.1. The perception of large forms. 3.8.2. The simple bi- and tripartite forms3.8.3. The sonata forms; 3.9. Conclusion; 4: Feature Structures for Representing Musical Constructions; 4.1. Feature structures in language; 4.2. Representation of a melody by a feature structure; 4.3. From musical motives to polyphony; 4.4. Dealing with harmony; 4.5. A few generic operations of feature structures; 4.5.1. Transformations by augmentation or diminution; 4.5.2. Mirror forms; 4.5.3. Reverse forms; 4.5.4. A few other transformations; 4.5.5. Expressive power of this formalism; 4.6. Elements of annotation of musical structures in XML. 4.6.1. Basic feature structures4.6.2. Advanced XML annotations for two-dimension structures; 4.6.3. Figures of sound in XML; 4.7. Perspectives; 5: A Rhetoric Analysis of Musical Works; 5.1. Discourse theories in linguistics; 5.1.1. The rhetorical structure theory; 5.1.2. The pragma-dialectic movement; 5.2. The rhetoric of the stylus phantasticus; 5.3. The rhetoric and argumentation dimensions of J.S. Bach's C. minor Passacaglia; 5.3.1. The global structure and the symbolic of numbers; 5.3.2. The structure of the argumentation in the Passacaglia; 5.4. The dialectics of the personality split.
Summary: Discourse analysis and rhetoric are very much developed in communication, linguistics, cognitive science and artificial intelligence. Besides theoretical investigations, discourse analysis is central in a number of application areas such as dialogue and negotiation, the semantic web, question answering or authoring systems. Music is also a natural language, more abstract and mathematical, which follows very strict construction principles. However, there is very limited and no recent literature on Music Discourse analysis using computational principles. This book aims at developing a central issue in musical discourse: modeling rhetoric and argumentation. It also contributes to the development of high-level multimedia annotation schemes for non-verbal communication.
Item type Location Call number Copy Status Date due
Books Books 780.04 / 1 (Browse shelf) Copy 001 Available

Bibliogr. p. [167]-175.

Cover page; Half-Title page; Title page; Copyright page; Contents; Preface; 1: An Introduction to Classical Rhetoric; 1.1. A few basic definitions; 1.2. The structure of rhetoric; 1.2.1. Rhetoric and communication; 1.2.2. The structure of classical rhetoric; 1.2.3. The invention step; 1.2.4. The arrangement; 1.2.5. The style or elocution step; 1.2.6. The delivery or action; 1.2.7. The facets of rhetoric; 1.3. Some figures of speech; 1.3.1. Introduction; 1.3.2. The major figures of speech of interest in music rhetoric; 1.4. Argumentation and explanation. 1.5. Conclusion: a few historical milestones of traditional rhetoric1.6. A few historical references for classical rhetoric; Classical period; Medieval; Renaissance; Eighteenth century; 2: Language, Music and the Rhetoric Discourse; 2.1. Music and language; 2.1.1. On the relations between language and music; 2.1.2. Going into the details of music parameters, music for rhetoric; 2.1.3. Music and rhetoric; 2.2. A few historical milestones of music rhetoric emergence and evolution; 2.2.1. The Middle Ages and the Renaissance; 2.2.2. The transition between the Renaissance and the Baroque period. 2.2.3. The Baroque period2.2.4. The Classical period; 2.2.5. The Romantic period; 2.3. Main contemporary trends in music rhetoric; 3: The Symbolism of Musical Elements; 3.1. Symbolic and perceptual properties of modes and tonalities; 3.2. Perceptual and symbolic properties of intervals; 3.3. Musical figures and their role in rhetoric; 3.4. Figures of rhythm and their roles in rhetoric; 3.5. Motive alternations; 3.6. Figures of counterpoint; 3.7. The symbolism of numbers and proportions; 3.8. The rhetoric contents of classical forms; 3.8.1. The perception of large forms. 3.8.2. The simple bi- and tripartite forms3.8.3. The sonata forms; 3.9. Conclusion; 4: Feature Structures for Representing Musical Constructions; 4.1. Feature structures in language; 4.2. Representation of a melody by a feature structure; 4.3. From musical motives to polyphony; 4.4. Dealing with harmony; 4.5. A few generic operations of feature structures; 4.5.1. Transformations by augmentation or diminution; 4.5.2. Mirror forms; 4.5.3. Reverse forms; 4.5.4. A few other transformations; 4.5.5. Expressive power of this formalism; 4.6. Elements of annotation of musical structures in XML. 4.6.1. Basic feature structures4.6.2. Advanced XML annotations for two-dimension structures; 4.6.3. Figures of sound in XML; 4.7. Perspectives; 5: A Rhetoric Analysis of Musical Works; 5.1. Discourse theories in linguistics; 5.1.1. The rhetorical structure theory; 5.1.2. The pragma-dialectic movement; 5.2. The rhetoric of the stylus phantasticus; 5.3. The rhetoric and argumentation dimensions of J.S. Bach's C. minor Passacaglia; 5.3.1. The global structure and the symbolic of numbers; 5.3.2. The structure of the argumentation in the Passacaglia; 5.4. The dialectics of the personality split.

Discourse analysis and rhetoric are very much developed in communication, linguistics, cognitive science and artificial intelligence. Besides theoretical investigations, discourse analysis is central in a number of application areas such as dialogue and negotiation, the semantic web, question answering or authoring systems. Music is also a natural language, more abstract and mathematical, which follows very strict construction principles. However, there is very limited and no recent literature on Music Discourse analysis using computational principles. This book aims at developing a central issue in musical discourse: modeling rhetoric and argumentation. It also contributes to the development of high-level multimedia annotation schemes for non-verbal communication.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Home: PUSC   Koha: koha-community.org   Facebook: Koha Gruppo Italiano

Languages: