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Teleology, first principles, and scientific method in Aristotle's biology /

by Gotthelf, Allan, autore .
Series: Oxford Aristotle studies : Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, c2012Description: xvi, 440 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780199287956.
Contents:
PART I: Teleology, Irreducibility, and the Generation of Animals (GA): 1: Aristotle's Conception of Final Causality. -- 2: The Place of the Good in Aristotle's Natural Teleology. -- 3: Understanding Aristotle's Teleology. -- 4: Teleology and Embryogenesis in Aristotle's Generation of Animals II.6. -- 5: 'What's Teleology Got to Do with It?'—A Reinterpretation of Aristotle's Generation of Animals V (co-authored with Mariska Leunissen). -- 6: Teleology and Spontaneous Generation in Aristotle: A Discussion. -- PART II: First Principles and Explanatory Structure in the Parts of Animals (PA): 7: First Principles in Aristotle's Parts of Animals. -- 8: The Elephant's Nose: Further Reflections on the Axiomatic Structure of Biological Explanation in Aristotle. -- 9: Division and Explanation in Aristotle's Parts of Animals. -- PART III: Metaphysical Themes in PA and GA: 10: Notes towards a Study of Substance and Essence in Aristotle's Parts of Animals II-IV. -- 11: A Biological Provenance: Reflections on Montgomery Furth's Substance, Form, and Psyche: An Aristotelean Metaphysics. -- PART IV: Starting a Science: Theoretical Aims of the History of Animals (HA): 12: Data-Organization, Classification, and Kinds: The Place of the History of Animals in Aristotle's Biological Enterprise. -- Appendix: A case for the ordering of the books of HA VII-IX and a question about the biological study of man that arises therefrom (co-authored with Pieter Beullens). -- 13: HA I.6 490b7-491a6: Aristotle's megista genê. -- 14: Historiae I: Plantarum et Animalium. -- PART V: Aristotle as Theoretical Biologist: 15: Darwin on Aristotle. -- Coda: Aristotle as Scientist: A Proper Verdict (with emphasis on his biological works).
Scope and content: This volume presents an interconnected set of sixteen essays, four of which are previously unpublished, by Allan Gotthelf—one of the leading experts in the study of Aristotle's biological writings. Gotthelf addresses three main topics across Aristotle's three main biological treatises. Starting with his own ground-breaking study of Aristotle's natural teleology and its illuminating relationship with the Generation of Animals, Gotthelf proceeds to the axiomatic structure of biological explanation (and the first principles such explanation proceeds from) in the Parts of Animals. After an exploration of the implications of these two treatises for our understanding of Aristotle's metaphysics, Gotthelf examines important aspects of the method by which Aristotle organizes his data in the History of Animals to make possible such a systematic, explanatory study of animals, offering a new view of the place of classification in that enterprise. In a concluding section on 'Aristotle as Theoretical Biologist', Gotthelf explores the basis of Charles Darwin's great praise of Aristotle and, in the first printing of a lecture delivered worldwide, provides an overview of Aristotle as a philosophically-oriented scientist, and 'a proper verdict' on his greatness as scientist.
Item type Location Call number Copy Status Notes Date due
Books Books Dip. Filosofia TD 815.14 (Browse shelf) Copy 001 Available Rist. del 2015.

Saggi in parte già pubbl.

Bibliogr. p. [399]-413.

PART I: Teleology, Irreducibility, and the Generation of Animals (GA): 1: Aristotle's Conception of Final Causality. -- 2: The Place of the Good in Aristotle's Natural Teleology. -- 3: Understanding Aristotle's Teleology. -- 4: Teleology and Embryogenesis in Aristotle's Generation of Animals II.6. -- 5: 'What's Teleology Got to Do with It?'—A Reinterpretation of Aristotle's Generation of Animals V (co-authored with Mariska Leunissen). -- 6: Teleology and Spontaneous Generation in Aristotle: A Discussion. -- PART II: First Principles and Explanatory Structure in the Parts of Animals (PA): 7: First Principles in Aristotle's Parts of Animals. -- 8: The Elephant's Nose: Further Reflections on the Axiomatic Structure of Biological Explanation in Aristotle. -- 9: Division and Explanation in Aristotle's Parts of Animals. -- PART III: Metaphysical Themes in PA and GA: 10: Notes towards a Study of Substance and Essence in Aristotle's Parts of Animals II-IV. -- 11: A Biological Provenance: Reflections on Montgomery Furth's Substance, Form, and Psyche: An Aristotelean Metaphysics. -- PART IV: Starting a Science: Theoretical Aims of the History of Animals (HA): 12: Data-Organization, Classification, and Kinds: The Place of the History of Animals in Aristotle's Biological Enterprise. -- Appendix: A case for the ordering of the books of HA VII-IX and a question about the biological study of man that arises therefrom (co-authored with Pieter Beullens). -- 13: HA I.6 490b7-491a6: Aristotle's megista genê. -- 14: Historiae I: Plantarum et Animalium. -- PART V: Aristotle as Theoretical Biologist: 15: Darwin on Aristotle. -- Coda: Aristotle as Scientist: A Proper Verdict (with emphasis on his biological works).

This volume presents an interconnected set of sixteen essays, four of which are previously unpublished, by Allan Gotthelf—one of the leading experts in the study of Aristotle's biological writings. Gotthelf addresses three main topics across Aristotle's three main biological treatises. Starting with his own ground-breaking study of Aristotle's natural teleology and its illuminating relationship with the Generation of Animals, Gotthelf proceeds to the axiomatic structure of biological explanation (and the first principles such explanation proceeds from) in the Parts of Animals. After an exploration of the implications of these two treatises for our understanding of Aristotle's metaphysics, Gotthelf examines important aspects of the method by which Aristotle organizes his data in the History of Animals to make possible such a systematic, explanatory study of animals, offering a new view of the place of classification in that enterprise. In a concluding section on 'Aristotle as Theoretical Biologist', Gotthelf explores the basis of Charles Darwin's great praise of Aristotle and, in the first printing of a lecture delivered worldwide, provides an overview of Aristotle as a philosophically-oriented scientist, and 'a proper verdict' on his greatness as scientist.

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