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Leibniz and the rational order of nature /

by Rutherford, Donald, autore .
Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1995Description: xiii, 301 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0521461553.Subject(s): Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm
Contents:
Part I, Theodicy: 1: The Vindication of Divine Justice. -- 2: The Maximization of Perfection and Harmony. -- 3: Happiness and Virtue in the Best of All Possible Worlds. -- Part II, First Philosophy: 4: Metaphysics and Its Method. -- 5: The Categories of Thought and Being. -- 6: Substance. -- Part III, Nature: 7: Modeling the Best of All Possible Worlds. -- 8: Monads, Matter, and Organisms. -- 9: Dynamics and the Reality of Matter. -- 10: Corporeal Substance and the Union of Soul and Body.
Summary: This comprehensive interpretation of the philosophy of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) reveals the systematic unity of Leibniz's thought, in which theodicy, ethics, metaphysics, and natural philosophy contribute to a single vision of the best of all possible worlds. The key idea underlying the system is the conception of nature as a harmonious order designed by God to maximize opportunities for the exercise of reason. From this emerges an ethical ideal in which the virtue and happiness of human beings are promoted through the gradual extension of intellectual enlightenment. Professor Rutherford argues that Leibniz's metaphysical theories are best understood as attempts to model the complex order and harmony of nature, thereby providing support for the claims of his theodicy. Through detailed textual analyses involving many unpublished manuscript sources, the author demonstrates the essential unity of Leibniz's philosophy and its neglected moral underpinnings.
Item type Location Call number Copy Status Notes Date due
Books Books Dip. Filosofia VC 2255 (Browse shelf) Copy 001 Available Rist. del 1997.

Bibliogr. p. [291-296.

Part I, Theodicy: 1: The Vindication of Divine Justice. -- 2: The Maximization of Perfection and Harmony. -- 3: Happiness and Virtue in the Best of All Possible Worlds. -- Part II, First Philosophy: 4: Metaphysics and Its Method. -- 5: The Categories of Thought and Being. -- 6: Substance. -- Part III, Nature: 7: Modeling the Best of All Possible Worlds. -- 8: Monads, Matter, and Organisms. -- 9: Dynamics and the Reality of Matter. -- 10: Corporeal Substance and the Union of Soul and Body.

This comprehensive interpretation of the philosophy of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) reveals the systematic unity of Leibniz's thought, in which theodicy, ethics, metaphysics, and natural philosophy contribute to a single vision of the best of all possible worlds. The key idea underlying the system is the conception of nature as a harmonious order designed by God to maximize opportunities for the exercise of reason. From this emerges an ethical ideal in which the virtue and happiness of human beings are promoted through the gradual extension of intellectual enlightenment. Professor Rutherford argues that Leibniz's metaphysical theories are best understood as attempts to model the complex order and harmony of nature, thereby providing support for the claims of his theodicy. Through detailed textual analyses involving many unpublished manuscript sources, the author demonstrates the essential unity of Leibniz's philosophy and its neglected moral underpinnings.

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